Break Diver Bryan Varner
Break Diver Bryan Varner
  • DIVER: Bryan Varner
  • NATIVE COUNTRY: USA
  • CATEGORY: Artist
  • DIVE: YouTuber
  • LEVEL: 1
  • REQUIREMENTS: Level 1 (Has started a YouTube channel solo or as part of a team)

When and why did you decide to pursue this dive?

I had been thinking about starting a YouTube channel at different points during the last few years. At one point, I even attempted starting a channel with some friends. However, these prior attempts and thoughts never amounted to very much, as I did not yet have a clear vision for what I wanted to do with it.

I think the fully realized decision to start a YouTube channel (as I am pursuing it now) came while I was working through Monroe Mann’s Time Zen course on Udemy. The lessons I learned from Time Zen helped me deeply consider what I wanted to do in life as well as helped me start establishing a plan for how I was going to get there.

I already knew that YouTube can be a great platform for building a personal brand and establishing oneself as an expert in the subject matter of the channel, and one of my life goals is to be recognized as an expert on martial arts and related practices, such as meditation and qigong. YouTube shall be one of the platforms I use to achieve this goal.

How long did it take for you to accomplish this dive from the day you decided to pursue it, and why did it take that long?

Honestly, starting my YouTube channel took far longer than it should have. As I said above, I had been thinking about doing this for a few years, though I can’t put an exact date on when. The fully realized vision for my path forward came sometime during January of this year while working through Monroe Mann’s Time Zen course, when I found out about Break Diving, and after joining, I found the final impetus and support I needed to finally make it happen.

On February 8th, 2020, I finally uploaded a channel introduction video to my channel: The Martial Scholar.

Why did it take so long to start? Largely it was inertia. I simply hadn’t taken the definitive step towards getting started by recording and uploading a video. I simply needed to get something out there. Now that I have done so and have gotten substantial feedback from the Break Diving community, I have a much better idea of how to improve my video creation process moving forward.

What do you think was the hardest part about achieving this dive level?

The hardest part was probably deciding exactly what I wanted to do with the channel. I didn’t have a plan. Starting a YouTube channel had been a vague idea with no clear idea of what it would be. I considered several things, but none of them really excited me enough to even get started. Once I knew what I wanted to do, I then had to break the inertia and simply start recording. Simply getting started was probably just as hard as deciding what I wanted to do with my YouTube channel.

What do you think was the easiest part about this dive level?

Once I broke the inertia and started working, everything seemed to sort of flow together from one step to the next. It really doesn’t take much to simply start a YouTube channel once you know what sort of channel you want to work on. Yes, there are lots of things to consider when working on a YouTube channel, but none of them are as important as putting content on the channel. Uploading content is very simple once you have something to upload. You simply can drag and drop the video file into the upload window, give it a title, and once it is done converting, just click the publish button. Voila! First YouTube video uploaded.

What is your advice for someone who is pursuing this dive and level?

As cliche as it is, the best advice I can give is this: If you are thinking about learning or doing anything, just start doing it. As the actor Shia Labeouf said in a motivational video he did five years ago, “Just Do It!” If you haven’t seen that video, go watch it. The message is amazing. Do it imperfectly.

My first video upload for my channel certainly wasn’t the highest level of content creation. But it was good enough to give me start, and good enough for others to look at it critically and give me suggestions on how to improve. As Jake the Dog from Adventure Time says, “Dude, sucking at something is the first step to being kinda good at something.”

So go be brave enough to suck at something new. After you do this new thing a few times, it isn’t as new and you will have gotten a lot better simply by trying. Kano Jigoro, the founder of Kodokan Judo, said, “If there is effort, there is always accomplishment.”

What are some of the best resources you recommend to those pursuing this dive at this level, and why do you recommend them? Please include relevant weblinks, if applicable.

As for resources, here are some suggestions:

  • Canva(https://www.canva.com/) is indispensable for easy graphical media creation. From Instagram posts and stories to logo creation to Facebook advertisements to business cards to photo collages and more, I have yet to find a platform that makes this process easier that is available on both desktop and smartphone. Plus, their website has a variety of tutorials to help you learn design, branding, marketing, photography, and more.
  • Splice – Video Editor and Maker (https://apps.apple.com/us/app/splice-video-editor-maker/id409838725) is incredible if you do any recording using an iPhone. The basic app is free to use, with some advanced options being available through a subscription. This app makes creating simple videos for YouTube and other platforms super simple and is what I used to create my first video.
  • VideoPad Video Editor (https://www.nchsoftware.com/videopad/index.html) is one of the easiest to use video editing software I have found for desktop use. It is a bit more complicated to use than Splice mentioned above, but it is still very easy to use once you know where most of the buttons are. If you plan on doing your recording, editing, and uploading from your desktop or laptop this may be a good option. It has a free trial to get started, and a paid license to continue using it.
  • Audacity(https://www.audacityteam.org/) is probably one of the best, and FOSS(free open source software), audio editing applications available. It allows you to record and break down the audio from multiple sources, remix them, and export various audio file types.
  • MakeUseOf(https://www.makeuseof.com/) has a lot of articles, product reviews, and tutorials on lots of subjects. If you are doing anything that involves technology, which is basically everything these days, this is a great place to look for information.
  • Youtube(https://www.youtube.com/) should be an obvious resource, but it is one that is overlooked for learning the relevant skills for running a YouTube channel. It may seem paradoxical, but watching videos on YouTube is one of the best things to do for someone starting a YouTube channel.

Tell us a story of one of your adventures pursuing this dive. (At least 5 paragraphs)

This has been interesting so far. Over the last couple of years, I have been thinking about starting a YouTube channel. A few years ago, I tried creating a gaming-based YouTube channel with two of my friends called Delinquent Velociraptor Media.

Ultimately, none of us were committed enough to take it very far or to even upload more than a few videos. We uploaded a total of 16 videos and had 9 subscribers that included ourselves. Life got in the way, and we never went back. If you wish to take a look at this channel for the sake of comparison, here is the link: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6ZHP1NS9X_0eVKNSymfaUw

After that, I did give up on the idea of having a YouTube channel. Several months ago, though, sometime last year, I thought I may try it again, but solo this time. The original idea again was still to be gaming, based this time, to focus largely on retro games. I started working on an associated Instagram account, Nerd Shirt Gaming, where I was planning on sharing pictures of retro gaming shirts and collectibles. I made a total of 4 posts before I stopped updating. I also had been planning on doing “live streams” on Twitch hit multiple gaming audiences. That didn’t happen.

The failure here largely fell to inertia. I simply stopped moving. It wasn’t for a lack of ideas–I just didn’t put any of the ideas into action.

Fast forward to today: I have watched a variety of other YouTube channels looking for inspiration on how to approach my current project. I follow several accounts on Instagram that share content about growing a successful online business. They suggest that you have a multi-pronged approach that includes using multiple platforms to feed traffic to each other in order to grow your outreach. This is what I am currently working on.

I have a blog that I started two years ago that I will begin working on again, martialscholar.com, and will be working on updates for that during the coming weeks. I also have created associated social media accounts for Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter that will be seeing content posts soon.

I believe that I have a solid plan and vision for what I want this new channel to become that is in line with where I want to be in life. From my many years learning martial arts, I know that showing up is half the battle. If I am consistent with creating videos and social media content, I will eventually see some degree of success from this endeavor.

How did you prove you met the requirements for this level?

You can find my YouTube channel at this link. Here is a screenshot:

I also submitted the URL to my YouTube page to the dive committee on Break Diving, and a number of members certified that I did indeed have my own YouTube channel. I hope you will check it out yourself too, watch some videos, and if you like, please subscribe! Help me get to 100! I’m slowly on my way!

Will you be pursuing the next level? If so, why? If not, why not?

I certainly intend to continue pursuing this path. I feel that it is a necessary part of my plans to get to the place I want to be in life where I can share my knowledge with the people of the world. I have a lot to learn about creating good content for YouTube, and it is exciting to learn how to do this effectively. I also hope to provide inspiration to others thinking about getting started. Perhaps one day after I am an established YouTuber I will mentor others in the process of starting their own channel.


And having made this post, and provided adequate evidence to the dive committee, Bryan Varner is now hereby certified by Break Diving, Inc. as: ARTIST – YOUTUBER – LEVEL 1.  Congratulations Bryan!  Thank you for being an inspiration to others!

The author above wrote this WYSEguidance post as one of the certification requirements to become certified by Break Diving, Inc. for a dive completed. Would you also like to find greater success, happiness, and friendship, and make genuine supportive connections with others around the world pursuing your same dreams? We will certify you in your life accomplishments, and help you find new dives to pursue! Come join us at www.breakdiving.io and soon your story will be the next one you read about on this site!

This Post Has One Comment

  1. Hey Bryan, congrats on starting your YouTube channel. Taking that first step towards success is always hard, and you’ve done it! I left a message for you and also subscribed.

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